MIT Great Barrier Reef Initiative Vlog 1

June 18th, 2018Fieldwork

By Sierra Rosenzweig '20 We have just arrived in Townsville, Australia in order to begin a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. We travel as a group of five students, three from MIT’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department and two from MIT’s Ocean Engineering sector of the Mechanical Engineering department. We have not yet set in stone our specific projects for our two month stay, but our goals are simple: learn the ways of the endangered reef ecosystem, and devise ways to engineer solutions. Due to alterations in water temperature, pH levels, and other side effects of global climate change, the Great Barrier Reef faces extreme danger and decay. We have set out to unveil these issues and engineer solutions to the disrepair.   Sierra Rosenzweig '20 is spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. 

By Sierra Rosenzweig ’20

We have just arrived in Townsville, Australia in order to begin a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. We travel as a group of five students, three from MIT’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department and two from MIT’s Ocean Engineering sector of the Mechanical Engineering department. We have not yet set in stone our specific projects for our two month stay, but our goals are simple: learn the ways of the endangered reef ecosystem, and devise ways to engineer solutions. Due to alterations in water temperature, pH levels, and other side effects of global climate change, the Great Barrier Reef faces extreme danger and decay. We have set out to unveil these issues and engineer solutions to the disrepair.

 

Sierra Rosenzweig ’20 is spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. 

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Abroad in Israel: Saying Goodbye to the Technion

June 11th, 2018Undergraduate Student Life

By Amy Vogel ’20 I am writing this post while sitting at my desk on my last day of work at the Technion. I am sad to leave the Technion, but I am so happy that I made the decision to go abroad for the semester, experience full-time research, and immerse myself in different cultures. I met up with an old friend in Tel Aviv ("Yalla" is Arabic / Hebrew slang for "let's go!") In the past few weeks, I have been working on modeling the highway *with* HOT lanes on TransModeler. (Up until a few weeks ago, we were working on getting the MATLAB model working with the current state of the highway, and now we are modeling the hypothetical.) The Ayalon is a private highway in Israel, and we were able to use un-implemented plans for HOT lanes, sent to us directly from the Ayalon office, in designing the HOT lanes for our model. Actually designing the HOT roads (e.g. figuring out where the lane should separate from the highway and where it should come back together) brought to my attention all the different factors that go into planning roads. For example, if the HOT lane is all the way on the left, and the road is splitting off in different directions, how do you design the HOT lane to also split in those directions while keeping it on the left? In addition to the TransModeler design, I spent the past few weeks finalizing the MATLAB code that [...]

By Amy Vogel ’20

I am writing this post while sitting at my desk on my last day of work at the Technion.

I am sad to leave the Technion, but I am so happy that I made the decision to go abroad for the semester, experience full-time research, and immerse myself in different cultures.

I met up with an old friend in Tel Aviv (“Yalla” is Arabic / Hebrew slang for “let’s go!”)

In the past few weeks, I have been working on modeling the highway *with* HOT lanes on TransModeler. (Up until a few weeks ago, we were working on getting the MATLAB model working with the current state of the highway, and now we are modeling the hypothetical.) The Ayalon is a private highway in Israel, and we were able to use un-implemented plans for HOT lanes, sent to us directly from the Ayalon office, in designing the HOT lanes for our model.

Actually designing the HOT roads (e.g. figuring out where the lane should separate from the highway and where it should come back together) brought to my attention all the different factors that go into planning roads. For example, if the HOT lane is all the way on the left, and the road is splitting off in different directions, how do you design the HOT lane to also split in those directions while keeping it on the left?

In addition to the TransModeler design, I spent the past few weeks finalizing the MATLAB code that I wrote. I mainly wrote two programs; one program is used to convert the format of the TransModeler output into something that we can use; the other program calculates the average travel times along different routes in the simulation.

I want to thank everyone who has welcomed me at the Technion! It was a really great experience, and I recommend that any undergraduate reading this to take some time to focus on a single project — either during the summer or a semester — because learning outside of the classroom is invaluable, and you’ll return to the classroom feeling refreshed.

The Technion Civil & Environmental Engineering Dean threw a pool party for the whole department! 

Outside a very scenic spot in Haifa

Amy Vogel ’20 is studying abroad in Israel at the Technion this semester, where she is working alongside Tomer Toledo, PhD ’03.

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Senior Tchelet Segev profiled on MIT News for her dedication to service

May 30th, 20182018 News in Brief

Tchelet Segev ’18 MEng ’18 was profiled on MIT News for her dedication to service during her four years at MIT. Segev was a member of numerous organizations, including the Undergraduate Association Special Projects Committee (UA), the UA Student Support and Wellness Committee, the Class Awareness Support and Equality student organization, and the MindHandHeart initiative. Segev is also a co-founder of Tea with Teachers, a YouTube series where students interview faculty members about their lives outside of the classroom. Read more on MIT News.

Tchelet Segev ’18 MEng ’18 was profiled on MIT News for her dedication to service during her four years at MIT. Segev was a member of numerous organizations, including the Undergraduate Association Special Projects Committee (UA), the UA Student Support and Wellness Committee, the Class Awareness Support and Equality student organization, and the MindHandHeart initiative. Segev is also a co-founder of Tea with Teachers, a YouTube series where students interview faculty members about their lives outside of the classroom. Read more on MIT News.

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Professor Elfatih Eltahir hosts workshop on “the Future of the Nile Water”

May 11th, 20182018 News in Brief

Professor Elfatih Eltahir, the Breene M. Kerr Professor of Hydrology and Climate, hosted an international workshop at MIT on “the Future of the Nile Water,” on April 26 and 27. At the workshop, Eltahir presented a proposal for Sustainable, Smart, Equitable and Incremental resolution of the Nile’s water conflict to participants from Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan. The proposal is based on research conducted by Eltahir’s students. Read more on Eltahir’s website and on MIT News.

Professor Elfatih Eltahir, the Breene M. Kerr Professor of Hydrology and Climate, hosted an international workshop at MIT on “the Future of the Nile Water,” on April 26 and 27. At the workshop, Eltahir presented a proposal for Sustainable, Smart, Equitable and Incremental resolution of the Nile’s water conflict to participants from Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan. The proposal is based on research conducted by Eltahir’s students. Read more on Eltahir’s website and on MIT News.

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Professor Lydia Bourouiba featured in Scientific American for her role in Breakthrough: Portraits of Women in Science

May 7th, 20182018 News in Brief

Assistant Professor Lydia Bourouiba was featured in Scientific American for her role in Breakthrough: Portraits of Women in Science, an anthology of short documentaries produced by Science Friday and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Breakthrough: Portraits of Women in Science highlights six distinguished scientists and their research. The aim of the anthology is to increase the public’s access to science and inspire and increase the numbers of minorities in STEM. Read more here.

Assistant Professor Lydia Bourouiba was featured in Scientific American for her role in Breakthrough: Portraits of Women in Science, an anthology of short documentaries produced by Science Friday and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Breakthrough: Portraits of Women in Science highlights six distinguished scientists and their research. The aim of the anthology is to increase the public’s access to science and inspire and increase the numbers of minorities in STEM. Read more here.

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Professor Yossi Sheffi featured in The Boston Globe

May 5th, 20182018 News in Brief

Yossi Sheffi, the Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering Systems and CEE, and Director of the Center for Transportation and Logistics, spoke with The Boston Globe about his book, “Balancing Green: When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To).’’ In the interview, Sheffi discusses how companies should approach sustainable practices and how it is integral to consider the entire supply chain process when evaluating a company’s impact on the environment. Read the article here.

Yossi Sheffi, the Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering Systems and CEE, and Director of the Center for Transportation and Logistics, spoke with The Boston Globe about his book, “Balancing Green: When to Embrace Sustainability in a Business (and When Not To).’’ In the interview, Sheffi discusses how companies should approach sustainable practices and how it is integral to consider the entire supply chain process when evaluating a company’s impact on the environment. Read the article here.

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