Professor Elfatih Eltahir’s group published new research that shows how to select village locations to prevent the spread of malaria in Africa

September 14th, 20182018 News in Brief

Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih Eltahir and former CEE graduate student Dr. Noriko Endo published a study on how wind direction directly effects the spread of malaria at the village scale. The findings were published in The Lancet Planetary Health and are based on three-years of field work in Ethiopia and coordinated numerical experimentation using HYDREMATS, a disease transmission model developed by CEE researchers. Read more here.

Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih Eltahir and former CEE graduate student Dr. Noriko Endo published a study on how wind direction directly effects the spread of malaria at the village scale. The findings were published in The Lancet Planetary Health and are based on three-years of field work in Ethiopia and coordinated numerical experimentation using HYDREMATS, a disease transmission model developed by CEE researchers. Read more here.

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Professor Franz-Josef Ulm and researcher Jeremy Gregory build architectural software tool

September 7th, 20182018 News in Brief

Concrete Sustainability Hub researchers Professor Franz-Josef Ulm, Principal Research Scientist Randolph Kirchain, Research Scientist Jeremy Gregory and CEE alumnus Joshua Hester '11 MNG '12 PhD ‘18, have developed software to be utilized when designing new buildings. The software provides a lifecycle analysis that allows for significant changes to be made during the building process. Read more on MIT News.

Concrete Sustainability Hub researchers Professor Franz-Josef Ulm, Principal Research Scientist Randolph Kirchain, Research Scientist Jeremy Gregory and CEE alumnus Joshua Hester ’11 MNG ’12 PhD ‘18, have developed software to be utilized when designing new buildings. The software provides a lifecycle analysis that allows for significant changes to be made during the building process. Read more on MIT News.

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Rayna Higuchi ’20 and research scientist Kunal Kupwade-Patil publish research on the use of biomass ash in engineered cementitious binders

September 7th, 20182018 News in Brief

Rayna Higuchi ’20 and CEE research scientist Dr. Kunal Kupwade-Patil recently had research published in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering journal that shows when combined, waste products from food production and power production waste can replace high-energy-input, hazardous cement. Higuchi started working in Professor Oral Buyukozturk’s Laboratory for Infrastructure Science and Sustainability as a mini-UROP student in 2016. She then evolved into a major contributor to the lab’s high-level research in the area of cementitious material innovations using locally available waste materials under the mentorship of Kupwade-Patil and Buyukozturk. Read more here.

Rayna Higuchi ’20 and CEE research scientist Dr. Kunal Kupwade-Patil recently had research published in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering journal that shows when combined, waste products from food production and power production waste can replace high-energy-input, hazardous cement. Higuchi started working in Professor Oral Buyukozturk’s Laboratory for Infrastructure Science and Sustainability as a mini-UROP student in 2016. She then evolved into a major contributor to the lab’s high-level research in the area of cementitious material innovations using locally available waste materials under the mentorship of Kupwade-Patil and Buyukozturk. Read more here.

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Abroad in Israel: Optibus Opportunities

August 24th, 2018Undergraduate Student Life

By Amy Vogel ’20 In the past two months that I’ve spent in Tel Aviv through MISTI Israel, I’ve had the unique opportunity to progress and grow alongside a company that’s doing the same. Since I’ve been working for Optibus, they’ve on-boarded more employees than I can count on one hand, adding to the main Tel Aviv office, San Francisco and European offices.  This is where I work! I’ve also had adventures working on projects in numerous departments, as Optibus’s official “Transportation Analyst.” In brief: Business Development: The Mass Transit Industry I started off by working on a market analysis for one of the sectors of the mass transit industry, a booming transportation sector that is overlooked, and could use some optimization. I wrote a 25-page report, and set up meetings with various contacts from all facets of that particular industry, so that we could learn more. Last Thursday, I had an amazing opportunity to present my findings in front of the entire company.  Presenting research at all-company meeting Marketing: Blogging Alongside the market report, I took on a few blogging projects for the Optibus Blog. This was a lot of fun because it involved talking to developers, and other people at the company, in order to learn all about the product, and then relate aspects of Optibus to everyday life. So far, the three posts I have published are: the commuter policy at Optibus [read: free e-scooters], one about utilizing AI to prevent bus bunching, and most recently, a [...]

By Amy Vogel ’20

In the past two months that I’ve spent in Tel Aviv through MISTI Israel, I’ve had the unique opportunity to progress and grow alongside a company that’s doing the same. Since I’ve been working for Optibus, they’ve on-boarded more employees than I can count on one hand, adding to the main Tel Aviv office, San Francisco and European offices.

 This is where I work!

I’ve also had adventures working on projects in numerous departments, as Optibus’s official “Transportation Analyst.” In brief:

Business Development: The Mass Transit Industry

I started off by working on a market analysis for one of the sectors of the mass transit industry, a booming transportation sector that is overlooked, and could use some optimization. I wrote a 25-page report, and set up meetings with various contacts from all facets of that particular industry, so that we could learn more. Last Thursday, I had an amazing opportunity to present my findings in front of the entire company.

 Presenting research at all-company meeting

Marketing: Blogging

Alongside the market report, I took on a few blogging projects for the Optibus Blog. This was a lot of fun because it involved talking to developers, and other people at the company, in order to learn all about the product, and then relate aspects of Optibus to everyday life. So far, the three posts I have published are: the commuter policy at Optibus [read: free e-scooters], one about utilizing AI to prevent bus bunching, and most recently, a post about NP Hard Problems in our scheduling algorithm. I also had the chance to record a demo video for Optibus which demonstrates how to use the platform!

Screen capture of Optibus platform

 

Product Design: Researching Technology Platforms

Finally, for the last few weeks, I have the opportunity to take part in examining the future directions of the Optibus platform. The product direction is actually very interesting, since it requires the use of additional layers of data within the system. Since we need so much room for customization, it’s no trivial decision. I’ve learned a ton about the new platforms, and yesterday I presented that information for R&D.

 

Company send-off for our Solutions Engineer heading to San Francisco to help a client

With two weeks left of my internship, I want to optibize my time here by enjoying Tel Aviv, soaking up the middle eastern sun, and putting my all into the rest of my projects at Optibus.

Visiting “HaTachana,” or the first train station in Tel Aviv

Another beautiful Israeli sunset

 

After spending the Spring 2018 semester studying abroad at the Technion in Israel, Amy Vogel ’20 is spending the summer interning in Tel Aviv at Optibus, a company that helps mass transit operators find transportation and planning solutions. Her abroad experiences have been facilitated by MISTI MIT-Israel.

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Professor Markus Buehler and Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics provided perspective on hierarchical nanomaterials from renewable sources

August 17th, 20182018 News in Brief

Professor Markus Buehler and members from his Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics published a paper in ACS Nano that highlights their perspective on the manufacturing of hierarchical nanostructured materials from sustainable sources, assembly techniques, and potential applications. Read more here.

Professor Markus Buehler and members from his Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics published a paper in ACS Nano that highlights their perspective on the manufacturing of hierarchical nanostructured materials from sustainable sources, assembly techniques, and potential applications. Read more here.

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Middle and high school students work with LAMM, present at MIT’s Materials Research Laboratory poster event

August 10th, 20182018 News in Brief

On August 8, high school and middle school students from around the Boston area presented four research posters at a Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) poster event. The students are working with Concord Middle School teacher, Doug Shattuck, who has been working with the Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics (LAMM) since 2012 in an outreach program that brings children to MIT to participate in research over the summer. The posters presented were entitled Martian Soil As A Possible Building Material, Assessing the Anti-Fouling Capability of Silk-Carbon Composites, Physical Strength and Structural Cohesion of Volumetric Ratios of Superfine Mojave Martian Simulant, and Glass Pyramids: An Alternative Building Style For Martian Soil. See the photo of the week below for more information.

On August 8, high school and middle school students from around the Boston area presented four research posters at a Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) poster event. The students are working with Concord Middle School teacher, Doug Shattuck, who has been working with the Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics (LAMM) since 2012 in an outreach program that brings children to MIT to participate in research over the summer. The posters presented were entitled Martian Soil As A Possible Building Material, Assessing the Anti-Fouling Capability of Silk-Carbon Composites, Physical Strength and Structural Cohesion of Volumetric Ratios of Superfine Mojave Martian Simulant, and Glass Pyramids: An Alternative Building Style For Martian Soil. See the photo of the week below for more information.

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