Professors Charlie Harvey and Heidi Nepf selected as 2018 AGU Fellows

August 10th, 20182018 News in Brief

Professor Charlie Harvey and Donald and Martha Harleman Professor Heidi Nepf were newly elected as 2018 AGU Fellows. Awarded to only 0.1% of members a year, AGU Fellows are AGU members whose “visionary leadership and scientific excellence have fundamentally advanced research in their respective fields.” Professors Harvey and Nepf will be honored at the AGU’s Fall Meeting 2018 in December. More information can be found here.

Professor Charlie Harvey and Donald and Martha Harleman Professor Heidi Nepf were newly elected as 2018 AGU Fellows. Awarded to only 0.1% of members a year, AGU Fellows are AGU members whose “visionary leadership and scientific excellence have fundamentally advanced research in their respective fields.” Professors Harvey and Nepf will be honored at the AGU’s Fall Meeting 2018 in December. More information can be found here.

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Research from Professor Elfatih Eltahir shows China could face deadly heat waves due to a combination of climate change and irrigation

August 3rd, 20182018 News in Brief

Research from Professor Elfatih Eltahir shows that China’s most populous and agriculturally important region could face deadly heat waves unless significant measures are taken at the global scale to limit greenhouse gas emissions, and mitigate climate change. The findings were published in Nature Communications. Read more on MIT News.

Research from Professor Elfatih Eltahir shows that China’s most populous and agriculturally important region could face deadly heat waves unless significant measures are taken at the global scale to limit greenhouse gas emissions, and mitigate climate change. The findings were published in Nature Communications. Read more on MIT News.

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Professor Otto Cordero and lab find bacteria on particle surfaces can impact the rates of carbon turnover in the ocean

July 27th, 20182018 News in Brief

Assistant Professor Otto Cordero and researchers from his lab published new research that suggests that ecological interactions between bacteria on particles’ surfaces can impact the rates of carbon turnover in the ocean. The results were published in Nature Communications. Read more here.

Assistant Professor Otto Cordero and researchers from his lab published new research that suggests that ecological interactions between bacteria on particles’ surfaces can impact the rates of carbon turnover in the ocean. The results were published in Nature Communications. Read more here.

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Professor Penny Chisholm presents TED Talk

July 13th, 20182018 News in Brief

Institute Professor Penny Chisholm presented a TED Talk on “the tiny creature that secretly powers the planet,” prochlorococcus. Watch here.  

Institute Professor Penny Chisholm presented a TED Talk on “the tiny creature that secretly powers the planet,” prochlorococcus. Watch here.

 

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ONE-MA3 2018: A Day of Gypsum

July 12th, 2018Fieldwork, ONE-MA3 2018

By Samantha D’Alonzo ’21 Our morning started with a 6:30am alarm, layers of sunscreen, and lots and lots of bug spray – all in preparation for truffle hunting in the Aramengo woods! After a quick breakfast, we ventured out on a two-hour search for the elusive and expensive truffle. Without an animal to sniff out the truffles for us, we had a lot of difficulty poking around the woods. Although we didn’t find any truffles, we did enjoy our early morning exercise and a chance to see a different side of Aramengo. After a quick second breakfast, we listened to a few lectures about gypsum. Marco and his Father discussing Ancient Egyptian materials, such as gypsum One of the Nicola’s restoration labs Gypsum was used in Egyptian time for various different purposes. Gypsum was widely used because it is easy to produce, fire retardant, hardens quickly, doesn’t deform, and, perhaps most importantly, requires a very low cooking temperature. This is beneficial because the cooking process does not produce as much carbon dioxide as the cooking processes of other building materials. The main issue with gypsum is gypsum’s solubility in water and its fragility compared to lime. Although gypsum has become less widespread and effective in the 19th and 20th century, it is still important to study the material because it is more sustainable and recyclable than other building materials. For example, the production of Portland cement, which is widely used today, makes up 8% of the world’s carbon footprint. After [...]

By Samantha D’Alonzo ’21

Our morning started with a 6:30am alarm, layers of sunscreen, and lots and lots of bug spray – all in preparation for truffle hunting in the Aramengo woods! After a quick breakfast, we ventured out on a two-hour search for the elusive and expensive truffle. Without an animal to sniff out the truffles for us, we had a lot of difficulty poking around the woods. Although we didn’t find any truffles, we did enjoy our early morning exercise and a chance to see a different side of Aramengo. After a quick second breakfast, we listened to a few lectures about gypsum.

Marco and his Father discussing Ancient Egyptian materials, such as gypsum


One of the Nicola’s restoration labs

Gypsum was used in Egyptian time for various different purposes. Gypsum was widely used because it is easy to produce, fire retardant, hardens quickly, doesn’t deform, and, perhaps most importantly, requires a very low cooking temperature. This is beneficial because the cooking process does not produce as much carbon dioxide as the cooking processes of other building materials. The main issue with gypsum is gypsum’s solubility in water and its fragility compared to lime.

Although gypsum has become less widespread and effective in the 19th and 20th century, it is still important to study the material because it is more sustainable and recyclable than other building materials. For example, the production of Portland cement, which is widely used today, makes up 8% of the world’s carbon footprint.

After the lectures, we cooked our own gypsum using the samples we took from the mine yesterday.


Admir preparing the gypsum

We ended the day with a presentation on Egyptian painting and an opportunity to make our own Egyptian paintings using authentic Egyptian materials, gypsum, and pigments.


Gianluigi demonstrating Egyptian painting techniques


Not an Egyptian painting, but an interesting original work made by Gianluigi when he was in his twenties

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MIT Great Barrier Reef Initiative – Australia Week 3

July 11th, 2018Fieldwork, MIT Great Barrier Reef Initiative

Sierra Rosenzweig '20, Amber VanHemel '19 and Zoe Lallas '20 are spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. While there, they will be vlogging about their experiences. Be sure to follow along!

Sierra Rosenzweig ’20, Amber VanHemel ’19 and Zoe Lallas ’20 are spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. While there, they will be vlogging about their experiences. Be sure to follow along!

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