ONE-MA3 2018: Learning Photogrammetry and DPI

June 20th, 2018Fieldwork, ONE-MA3 2018

By Rachel Weissman '21 After a weekend of kayaking and beaches, we began our real work on Monday, June 18. In the morning we received a guest lecture from Diego Ronchi, a doctorate student at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome. He taught us about photogrammetry, digital photography, and the basics of computer graphics. We learned how software such as PhotoScan and CloudCompare works to convert 2D photos into 3D point clouds and 3D meshes. Understanding the basic computing behind these programs, and the relationship between photosensors found in cameras and digital displays on computers helped us as we used our own data to make 3D models in the afternoon. Collecting pictures from courtyard In the afternoon, we split into three groups.  One group worked with the drone, one worked with DPI, and the third worked with photogrammetry.  Both the drone group and the photogrammetry collected photographic data on the courtyard of our castle.  While the drone group collected pictures from a bird’s eye view, the photogrammetry group used a simple point and shoot camera, as well as their iPhones, to take more detailed pictures of the area.  Together these two groups combined their photos in PhotoScan to make a model of our courtyard with details of the wells, pillars, and crests. Details of well from courtyard Details of Caetani crest found on wall in courtyard DPI (dots per inch) technology uses infrared sensors to compute the 3D conformation of an object or room.  This infrared data is combined with [...]

By Rachel Weissman ’21

After a weekend of kayaking and beaches, we began our real work on Monday, June 18. In the morning we received a guest lecture from Diego Ronchi, a doctorate student at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome. He taught us about photogrammetry, digital photography, and the basics of computer graphics. We learned how software such as PhotoScan and CloudCompare works to convert 2D photos into 3D point clouds and 3D meshes. Understanding the basic computing behind these programs, and the relationship between photosensors found in cameras and digital displays on computers helped us as we used our own data to make 3D models in the afternoon.

Collecting pictures from courtyard

In the afternoon, we split into three groups.  One group worked with the drone, one worked with DPI, and the third worked with photogrammetry.  Both the drone group and the photogrammetry collected photographic data on the courtyard of our castle.  While the drone group collected pictures from a bird’s eye view, the photogrammetry group used a simple point and shoot camera, as well as their iPhones, to take more detailed pictures of the area.  Together these two groups combined their photos in PhotoScan to make a model of our courtyard with details of the wells, pillars, and crests.

Details of well from courtyard

Details of Caetani crest found on wall in courtyard

DPI (dots per inch) technology uses infrared sensors to compute the 3D conformation of an object or room.  This infrared data is combined with digital photography to capture the color of the object as well.  This technology works best with smaller objects and in shaded areas so the infrared rays are not distorted by sunlight.  The DPI group modeled a small wooden statue of Jesus on the cross and a stone stature of Mary and Baby Jesus.

Picture of Jesus statue (right) and the screenshot of statue reconstructed in PhotoScan (left)

In the evening, we presented our work to the rest of the class. We shared our successes and failures, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. We then enjoyed a delicous dinner while watching the World Cup projected into the wall of our midieval castle.

And of course, we ended the day with plenty of gelato.

 

This summer, Professor Admir Masic is leading a program on Materials in Art, Archaeology and Architecture (ONE-MA3), in which MIT undergraduates are conducting three weeks of fieldwork in Privernum, Pompeii and Turin as a prerequisite for the Fall 2018 MIT course, 1.057 Heritage Science and Technology.  The program involves real-world analysis of ancient infrastructures and materials and focus on teaching ways to improve sustainability of the future through the study of ancient successes.

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ONE-MA3 2018: Adventuring with Area.3 

June 19th, 2018Fieldwork, ONE-MA3 2018

By Sophie Cohen '21 Today it seemed as if we were adopted by an extended Italian family - the family who operates the Gruppo Canoisti Pontini, aka Area.3, in Sermoneta. They took us trekking up to the Castello dell’Acquapuzza, which looks out onto grassy fields that are the home of white Bufala mozzarella cows and Sermoneta. The tower was used as a look out during the Middle Ages. One of our guides, Fabrizio, showed us a map that spans the region under the tower, and described that people used maps such as that to determine where they should build Roman villages. Hundreds of years ago, the land that is now the valley below Caetani Castle was covered by water. Fabricio showing us the map We climbed over rocks to reach the tower and were able scale up to its lowest level, a cave with a hole in its ceiling that allowed us to see to the very top of the tower. The interior of the tower After climbing down from the tower, we journeyed back to our starting point by kayak and canoe. We paddled against the current for almost four kilometers. Upon our return we had a big barbecue of homemade Italian food in the backyard of the Gruppo Canoisti Pontini’s family home, where about six of them live. Italians and Americans enjoying the barbecue On our way back to the castle we, of course, stopped for gelato. But this was only after we’d lost our soccer ball in the [...]

By Sophie Cohen ’21

Today it seemed as if we were adopted by an extended Italian family – the family who operates the Gruppo Canoisti Pontini, aka Area.3, in Sermoneta. They took us trekking up to the Castello dell’Acquapuzza, which looks out onto grassy fields that are the home of white Bufala mozzarella cows and Sermoneta. The tower was used as a look out during the Middle Ages. One of our guides, Fabrizio, showed us a map that spans the region under the tower, and described that people used maps such as that to determine where they should build Roman villages. Hundreds of years ago, the land that is now the valley below Caetani Castle was covered by water.

Fabricio showing us the map

We climbed over rocks to reach the tower and were able scale up to its lowest level, a cave with a hole in its ceiling that allowed us to see to the very top of the tower.

The interior of the tower

After climbing down from the tower, we journeyed back to our starting point by kayak and canoe. We paddled against the current for almost four kilometers. Upon our return we had a big barbecue of homemade Italian food in the backyard of the Gruppo Canoisti Pontini’s family home, where about six of them live.

Italians and Americans enjoying the barbecue

On our way back to the castle we, of course, stopped for gelato. But this was only after we’d lost our soccer ball in the river one last time…

Retrieving the ball

This summer, Professor Admir Masic is leading a program on Materials in Art, Archaeology and Architecture (ONE-MA3), in which MIT undergraduates are conducting three weeks of fieldwork in Privernum, Pompeii and Turin as a prerequisite for the Fall 2018 MIT course, 1.057 Heritage Science and Technology.  The program involves real-world analysis of ancient infrastructures and materials and focus on teaching ways to improve sustainability of the future through the study of ancient successes.

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ONE-MA3 2018: Balancing conservation of nature and history

June 19th, 2018Fieldwork, ONE-MA3 2018

By Patricia Gao '21 Trees yawned. Water sparkled. Flowers bloomed, in the midst of clouds of butterflies. All of it happened around, over, and through the remains of a medieval village. This was the most romantic garden on Earth (according to Wikipedia).  An Italian stone pine towers over banana trees growing around the remains of an ancient wall The garden I speak of is an English landscape garden in the province of Latina, Italy, and brings together plants from all over the world. Though a lot of English landscape gardens are structured around architecture, the Gardens of Ninfa is unique in that its architecture is not a recreation of an ancient, picturesque building. It is, instead, built on what used to be a large town in the Middle Ages. This makes its views quite unique, as plant life slowly takes over crumbling stone placed there around the 11th century. This tree, which fell in the garden a few years ago, narrowly missed a ruin nearby The problems that face the Gardens of Ninfa are unique as well. Because the vegetation interacts with old buildings, archaeologists and the owners of the garden struggle to find a compromise between protecting nature and preserving history. ONE-MA3 is involved in this process — we traveled to the site today to collect data which will be used to 3D reconstruct some of the ruins. Hopefully, our information will help determine the best methods to allow the garden elements to continue coexisting. The Gardens of Ninfa [...]

By Patricia Gao ’21

Trees yawned. Water sparkled. Flowers bloomed, in the midst of clouds of butterflies. All of it happened around, over, and through the remains of a medieval village. This was the most romantic garden on Earth (according to Wikipedia).

 An Italian stone pine towers over banana trees growing around the remains of an ancient wall

The garden I speak of is an English landscape garden in the province of Latina, Italy, and brings together plants from all over the world. Though a lot of English landscape gardens are structured around architecture, the Gardens of Ninfa is unique in that its architecture is not a recreation of an ancient, picturesque building. It is, instead, built on what used to be a large town in the Middle Ages. This makes its views quite unique, as plant life slowly takes over crumbling stone placed there around the 11th century.

This tree, which fell in the garden a few years ago, narrowly missed a ruin nearby

The problems that face the Gardens of Ninfa are unique as well. Because the vegetation interacts with old buildings, archaeologists and the owners of the garden struggle to find a compromise between protecting nature and preserving history. ONE-MA3 is involved in this process — we traveled to the site today to collect data which will be used to 3D reconstruct some of the ruins. Hopefully, our information will help determine the best methods to allow the garden elements to continue coexisting.

The Gardens of Ninfa is cited as one of the most beautiful gardens in the world

This summer, Professor Admir Masic is leading a program on Materials in Art, Archaeology and Architecture (ONE-MA3), in which MIT undergraduates are conducting three weeks of fieldwork in Privernum, Pompeii and Turin as a prerequisite for the Fall 2018 MIT course, 1.057 Heritage Science and Technology.  The program involves real-world analysis of ancient infrastructures and materials and focus on teaching ways to improve sustainability of the future through the study of ancient successes.

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ONE-MA3 2018: A Day in Priverno

June 18th, 2018Fieldwork, ONE-MA3 2018

By Sophie Cohen '21 A metal triangle hangs on the side of the Caetani Castle’s kitchen exterior, and the chefs’ children hit it with a hammer to signal meal times. This is how our day began, when we all entered the medieval dining room for breakfast, and then headed by van to Priverno to spend the day touring museums. First we visited the Abbazia di Fossanova. The sculpture inside of the abbey is typical of Cistercian art, with basic decoration and minimal use of symbols. The interior is lit only by the windows in the nave and apse and a few religious candles visitors can light. The abbey was built on top of the ruins of a Roman villa. Next we visited the adjoining museum, which stores ceramics, frescoes, relics, and other artifacts spanning several centuries. Below is a fresco of the Madonna. The first layer of this fresco was made in the 6-7th century, and the second layer in the 9-10th century. After winding our way up the miniature streets of Priverno, we entered our second museum of the day, the Museo Archelogico di Priverno. The artifacts within this museum date as far back as to pre Roman times. A few of these artifacts are pictured below. Fragments of an ancient Roman calendar   The only known statue of the Emperor Claudio An example of micro mosaics representing the Nile River After a languid, multi course lunch in Priverno, we spent the rest of the afternoon at the seaside [...]

By Sophie Cohen ’21

A metal triangle hangs on the side of the Caetani Castle’s kitchen exterior, and the chefs’ children hit it with a hammer to signal meal times. This is how our day began, when we all entered the medieval dining room for breakfast, and then headed by van to Priverno to spend the day touring museums.

First we visited the Abbazia di Fossanova. The sculpture inside of the abbey is typical of Cistercian art, with basic decoration and minimal use of symbols. The interior is lit only by the windows in the nave and apse and a few religious candles visitors can light. The abbey was built on top of the ruins of a Roman villa.

Next we visited the adjoining museum, which stores ceramics, frescoes, relics, and other artifacts spanning several centuries. Below is a fresco of the Madonna. The first layer of this fresco was made in the 6-7th century, and the second layer in the 9-10th century.

After winding our way up the miniature streets of Priverno, we entered our second museum of the day, the Museo Archelogico di Priverno. The artifacts within this museum date as far back as to pre Roman times. A few of these artifacts are pictured below.

Fragments of an ancient Roman calendar

 

The only known statue of the Emperor Claudio

An example of micro mosaics representing the Nile River


After a languid, multi course lunch in Priverno, we spent the rest of the afternoon at the seaside playing soccer, body surfing, and relaxing on the beach in Sabaudia.

This summer, Professor Admir Masic is leading a program on Materials in Art, Archaeology and Architecture (ONE-MA3), in which MIT undergraduates are conducting three weeks of fieldwork in Privernum, Pompeii and Turin as a prerequisite for the Fall 2018 MIT course, 1.057 Heritage Science and Technology.  The program involves real-world analysis of ancient infrastructures and materials and focus on teaching ways to improve sustainability of the future through the study of ancient successes.

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MIT Great Barrier Reef Initiative Vlog 1

June 18th, 2018Fieldwork

By Sierra Rosenzweig '20 We have just arrived in Townsville, Australia in order to begin a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. We travel as a group of five students, three from MIT’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department and two from MIT’s Ocean Engineering sector of the Mechanical Engineering department. We have not yet set in stone our specific projects for our two month stay, but our goals are simple: learn the ways of the endangered reef ecosystem, and devise ways to engineer solutions. Due to alterations in water temperature, pH levels, and other side effects of global climate change, the Great Barrier Reef faces extreme danger and decay. We have set out to unveil these issues and engineer solutions to the disrepair.   Sierra Rosenzweig '20 is spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. 

By Sierra Rosenzweig ’20

We have just arrived in Townsville, Australia in order to begin a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. We travel as a group of five students, three from MIT’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department and two from MIT’s Ocean Engineering sector of the Mechanical Engineering department. We have not yet set in stone our specific projects for our two month stay, but our goals are simple: learn the ways of the endangered reef ecosystem, and devise ways to engineer solutions. Due to alterations in water temperature, pH levels, and other side effects of global climate change, the Great Barrier Reef faces extreme danger and decay. We have set out to unveil these issues and engineer solutions to the disrepair.

 

Sierra Rosenzweig ’20 is spending the summer in Australia and New Zealand and participating in a new research and engineering project in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Marine Science and James Cook University on the Great Barrier Reef. 

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Abroad in Israel: Saying Goodbye to the Technion

June 11th, 2018Undergraduate Student Life

By Amy Vogel ’20 I am writing this post while sitting at my desk on my last day of work at the Technion. I am sad to leave the Technion, but I am so happy that I made the decision to go abroad for the semester, experience full-time research, and immerse myself in different cultures. I met up with an old friend in Tel Aviv ("Yalla" is Arabic / Hebrew slang for "let's go!") In the past few weeks, I have been working on modeling the highway *with* HOT lanes on TransModeler. (Up until a few weeks ago, we were working on getting the MATLAB model working with the current state of the highway, and now we are modeling the hypothetical.) The Ayalon is a private highway in Israel, and we were able to use un-implemented plans for HOT lanes, sent to us directly from the Ayalon office, in designing the HOT lanes for our model. Actually designing the HOT roads (e.g. figuring out where the lane should separate from the highway and where it should come back together) brought to my attention all the different factors that go into planning roads. For example, if the HOT lane is all the way on the left, and the road is splitting off in different directions, how do you design the HOT lane to also split in those directions while keeping it on the left? In addition to the TransModeler design, I spent the past few weeks finalizing the MATLAB code that [...]

By Amy Vogel ’20

I am writing this post while sitting at my desk on my last day of work at the Technion.

I am sad to leave the Technion, but I am so happy that I made the decision to go abroad for the semester, experience full-time research, and immerse myself in different cultures.

I met up with an old friend in Tel Aviv (“Yalla” is Arabic / Hebrew slang for “let’s go!”)

In the past few weeks, I have been working on modeling the highway *with* HOT lanes on TransModeler. (Up until a few weeks ago, we were working on getting the MATLAB model working with the current state of the highway, and now we are modeling the hypothetical.) The Ayalon is a private highway in Israel, and we were able to use un-implemented plans for HOT lanes, sent to us directly from the Ayalon office, in designing the HOT lanes for our model.

Actually designing the HOT roads (e.g. figuring out where the lane should separate from the highway and where it should come back together) brought to my attention all the different factors that go into planning roads. For example, if the HOT lane is all the way on the left, and the road is splitting off in different directions, how do you design the HOT lane to also split in those directions while keeping it on the left?

In addition to the TransModeler design, I spent the past few weeks finalizing the MATLAB code that I wrote. I mainly wrote two programs; one program is used to convert the format of the TransModeler output into something that we can use; the other program calculates the average travel times along different routes in the simulation.

I want to thank everyone who has welcomed me at the Technion! It was a really great experience, and I recommend that any undergraduate reading this to take some time to focus on a single project — either during the summer or a semester — because learning outside of the classroom is invaluable, and you’ll return to the classroom feeling refreshed.

The Technion Civil & Environmental Engineering Dean threw a pool party for the whole department! 

Outside a very scenic spot in Haifa

Amy Vogel ’20 is studying abroad in Israel at the Technion this semester, where she is working alongside Tomer Toledo, PhD ’03.

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