Markus Buehler Awarded 2021 Daniel C. Drucker Medal

June 21st, 2021News

Professor Markus Buehler has been awarded the 2021 Daniel C. Drucker Medal by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The Drucker Medal was established in 1997 in honor of American civil and mechanical engineer and academic, Daniel C. Drucker. According to ASME, the Daniel C. Drucker Medal is “conferred in recognition of distinguished contributions to the field of applied mechanics and mechanical engineering through research, teaching and service to the community over a substantial period of time." This year, ASME selected Buehler to receive the 2021 Daniel C. Drucker Medal for his “contributions to [...]

Professor Markus Buehler has been awarded the 2021 Daniel C. Drucker Medal by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

The Drucker Medal was established in 1997 in honor of American civil and mechanical engineer and academic, Daniel C. Drucker. According to ASME, the Daniel C. Drucker Medal is “conferred in recognition of distinguished contributions to the field of applied mechanics and mechanical engineering through research, teaching and service to the community over a substantial period of time.”

This year, ASME selected Buehler to receive the 2021 Daniel C. Drucker Medal for his “contributions to the use of molecular mechanics and chemical principles to elucidate the mechanics of natural and bio-inspired materials, and the design of mechanically optimized composite materials through hierarchical structuring from nano to macroscales.”

Buehler’s prolific work focuses on the atomic-level properties and structures of biomaterials such as silk, elastin or collagen to characterize, model and create new sustainable materials with architectural features from the nano to the macro-scale. His distinct work also intersects science and art with the development of protein-based musical compositions, supported by AI and used as a tool to educate, understand, and design.

Buehler is the Jerry McAfee (1940) Professor in Engineering and served as the Department Head of the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering between 2013-2020. He has authored more than 450 peer-reviewed publications and has attracted international attention for his work on computational modeling of biological protein-based materials to understand their mechanical properties, especially failure.

The award will be bestowed during the 2021 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition (IMECE) in November.

Read more about the Drucker Medal at ASME and the ASME Applied Mechanics Division Chair Yuri Bazilevs’ award announcement at iMechnica.org.

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Prof. Oral Buyukozturk Receives Hojjat Adeli Award for Innovation in Computing

June 11th, 2021News

Professor Oral Buyukozturk received the 2020 Hojjat Adeli Award for Innovation in Computing for his journal paper “Collaborative duty cycling strategies in energy harvesting sensor networks” published in the Journal of Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The paper was co-authored with James Long, MIT PhD ’17 and postdoc ‘20. In this manuscript, Buyukozturk and Long presented a comprehensive simulation that emulates the behavior of an energy harvesting sensor network, and used this simulation to develop monitoring strategies that maximize utility for civil infrastructure applications while minimizing energy consumption. The Hojjat Adeli Award for Innovation in Computing was established by Wiley-Blackwell [...]

Professor Oral Buyukozturk received the 2020 Hojjat Adeli Award for Innovation in Computing for his journal paper “Collaborative duty cycling strategies in energy harvesting sensor networks” published in the Journal of Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The paper was co-authored with James Long, MIT PhD ’17 and postdoc ‘20. In this manuscript, Buyukozturk and Long presented a comprehensive simulation that emulates the behavior of an energy harvesting sensor network, and used this simulation to develop monitoring strategies that maximize utility for civil infrastructure applications while minimizing energy consumption.

The Hojjat Adeli Award for Innovation in Computing was established by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing in 2010 and awarded annually to the most innovative paper published in the Journal of Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering. The journal is one of the most prestigious and highest-ranking journals in infrastructure computing.

Buyukozturk is a George Macomber Professor, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Director of the Laboratory for Infrastructure Science and Sustainability. He received his PhD in Structural Engineering from Cornell University and joined the MIT faculty in 1976.

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Visualizing cement hydration on a molecular level

June 7th, 2021Research

Imaging technique could enable new pathways for reducing concrete’s hefty carbon footprint, as well as for 3-D printing of concrete. The concrete world that surrounds us owes its shape and durability to chemical reactions that start when ordinary Portland cement is mixed with water. Now, MIT scientists have demonstrated a way to watch these reactions under real-world conditions, an advance that may help researchers find ways to make concrete more sustainable. The study is a “Brothers Lumière moment for concrete science,” says co-author Franz-Josef Ulm, professor of civil and environmental engineering and faculty director of the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub, [...]

Imaging technique could enable new pathways for reducing concrete’s hefty carbon footprint, as well as for 3-D printing of concrete.

The concrete world that surrounds us owes its shape and durability to chemical reactions that start when ordinary Portland cement is mixed with water. Now, MIT scientists have demonstrated a way to watch these reactions under real-world conditions, an advance that may help researchers find ways to make concrete more sustainable.

The study is a “Brothers Lumière moment for concrete science,” says co-author Franz-Josef Ulm, professor of civil and environmental engineering and faculty director of the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub, referring to the two brothers who ushered in the era of projected films. Likewise, Ulm says, the MIT team has provided a glimpse of early-stage cement hydration that is like cinema in Technicolor compared to the black and white photos of earlier research.

Cement in concrete contributes about 8 percent of the world’s total carbon dioxide emissions, rivaling the emissions produced by most individual countries. With a better understanding of cement chemistry, scientists could potentially “alter production or change ingredients so that concrete has less of an impact on emissions, or add ingredients that are capable of actively absorbing carbon dioxide,” says Admir Masic, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Next-generation technologies like 3D printing of concrete could also benefit from the study’s new imaging technique, which shows how cement hydrates and hardens in place, says Masic Lab graduate student Hyun-Chae Chad Loh, who also works as a materials scientist with the company Black Buffalo 3D Corporation.

Loh is the first author of the study published in ACS Langmuir, joining Ulm, Masic, and postdoc Hee-Jeong Rachel Kim.

Read the full article on MIT News

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CEE Awards and Honors 2021

June 3rd, 2021News

Today, the annual CEE Award recipients were announced during a virtual ceremony. Congratulations to all the students, postdocs, faculty and staff for their outstanding work, exceptional achievement and commitment to the values and mission of the department. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS CEE Best Undergraduate Research Award - Jarek Kwiecinski The Juan Hermosilla (1957) Prize .- Luke Bastian The Leo (Class of 1924) and Mary Grossman Award -Aron Brenner The Paul L. Busch (1958) Prize - Selma Sharaf GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS CEE Best Doctoral Thesis - Isabelle Su The Trond Kaalstad (Class of 1957) Fellowship - Annika Gomez Maseeh Annual Award for [...]

Today, the annual CEE Award recipients were announced during a virtual ceremony. Congratulations to all the students, postdocs, faculty and staff for their outstanding work, exceptional achievement and commitment to the values and mission of the department.

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS

CEE Best Undergraduate Research Award – Jarek Kwiecinski

The Juan Hermosilla (1957) Prize .- Luke Bastian

The Leo (Class of 1924) and Mary Grossman Award –Aron Brenner

The Paul L. Busch (1958) Prize – Selma Sharaf

GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS

CEE Best Doctoral Thesis – Isabelle Su

The Trond Kaalstad (Class of 1957) Fellowship – Annika Gomez

Maseeh Annual Award for Excellence as a Teaching Assistant – Linda Seymour

POSTDOCTORAL AWARDS

CEE Postdoctoral Scholar Mentoring, Teaching and Excellence Award –Matti Gralka

STAFF AWARDS

CEE Excellence AwardKathleen Briana & Bori Stoyanova

FACULTY AWARDS

Maseeh Excellence in Teaching Award – Prof. Josephine Carstensen

Distinguished Service and Leadership Award – Prof. Markus Buehler

MIT SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AWARDS

Henry Ford II Scholar Award – Jarek Kwiecinski

Infinite Mile Award – Roberta Pizzinato

The Ellen J. Mandigo AwardVicki Murphy

To see past award winners and learn more about the award categories, visit: https://cee.mit.edu/cee-awards/

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A new ocean soundscape

May 24th, 2021Graduate Profile

MIT-WHOI Joint Program student turns ocean data into tunes When you think of the sounds of the ocean, you might think of waves pounding on the shore or the call of a humpback whale. But can the ocean create music? In a sense, it can. Noah Germolus, a third-year MIT-WHOI Joint Program chemical oceanography student, converts chemical data he’s gathered in the ocean into musical notes he plays on his tenor sax. His original compositions are not only interesting to the ear, but offer a unique window into the chemical makeup of different areas of the ocean. The idea grew [...]

MIT-WHOI Joint Program student turns ocean data into tunes

When you think of the sounds of the ocean, you might think of waves pounding on the shore or the call of a humpback whale. But can the ocean create music?

In a sense, it can. Noah Germolus, a third-year MIT-WHOI Joint Program chemical oceanography student, converts chemical data he’s gathered in the ocean into musical notes he plays on his tenor sax. His original compositions are not only interesting to the ear, but offer a unique window into the chemical makeup of different areas of the ocean.

The idea grew out of Synergy II, a volunteer-based program aimed at conveying ocean science through artistic expression. For the program, Germolus paired up with a former museum director and contemporary artist, Heather Stivison. They are working together on a four-painting exhibit that Germolus describes as “expressively representative” of ocean chemistry.

“Working with Heather got me looking at art a bit differently,” he says. “But I’m not a visual artist, so I wanted to stimulate a different sense and turn the same data that was used to inspire the paintings into music.”

Germolus is passionate about music and has played in rock bands as a saxophone player and singer since his undergrad days. He’s also had a long-time fascination with chemistry, something that stems from his own realization that chemicals are essential to the life of every living cell.

“Music and chemistry complement each other, and this project is probably the only time I’ve tried to so explicitly connect the two things,” he says. “I’ve tried writing lyrics about chemistry before, but believe me: they were either hopelessly obtuse or tiringly pedantic.”

Read more in Oceanus Magazine on the Woods Hole Oceangraphic Institution.

Learn more about the CEE joint graduate program with WHOI

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New study examines topology optimization of rigid interlocking assemblies

May 17th, 2021Research

Building materials and construction is growing and responsible for 11 percent of carbon emissions. How can we design and build better materials and structures that can reduce emissions and have better impacts on the environment? These are some of the questions being investigated in the top+ad lab of Assistant Professor, Josephine Carstensen, where topology optimization design methods are examined to leverage new and improved manufacturing possibilities. Carstensen’s latest research examines the complex challenge of using topology optimization for the design process of rigid interlocking assemblies to lock components into place without use of adhesives or fasteners such as mortar, glue, [...]

Building materials and construction is growing and responsible for 11 percent of carbon emissions. How can we design and build better materials and structures that can reduce emissions and have better impacts on the environment? These are some of the questions being investigated in the top+ad lab of Assistant Professor, Josephine Carstensen, where topology optimization design methods are examined to leverage new and improved manufacturing possibilities.

Carstensen’s latest research examines the complex challenge of using topology optimization for the design process of rigid interlocking assemblies to lock components into place without use of adhesives or fasteners such as mortar, glue, bolts, nails or screws. Examples of rigid interlocks can be found in timber framing, constructed globally and throughout history, in both building and furniture carpentry. For the example of building and designing with wood, most traditional interlocking connections have straight edges that can be manually cut by saws and chisels. According to the study, these straight edge requirements leave a large range of unexplored design options. With the recent rapid development of manufacturing technologies, such as 3D printing and CNC machining, the design and performance of rigid interlocking assemblies for various applications have gained renewed relevance, interest, and development potential.

You can read more about the study on Science Direct website.

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