Mohamad Sindi ’19 PhD awarded MIT Shoji Award for Innovation

November 15th, 2019Uncategorized

Mohamad Sindi CEE alumnus Mohamad Sindi was recently honored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for his PhD work. He was awarded the MIT Shoji Award for Innovation for his thesis addressing the issue of fault-tolerance for large-scale High Performance Computing (HPC) workloads. The award was presented on Oct 22 by Dr. Mikio Shoji, a longtime supporter of MIT. Dr. Sindi’s PhD work has previously won the IEEE Innovative Paper Award, as well as research grants and support from Amazon, Schlumberger, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL).

Mohamad Sindi CEE alumnus Mohamad Sindi was recently honored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for his PhD work. He was awarded the MIT Shoji Award for Innovation for his thesis addressing the issue of fault-tolerance for large-scale High Performance Computing (HPC) workloads. The award was presented on Oct 22 by Dr. Mikio Shoji, a longtime supporter of MIT. Dr. Sindi’s PhD work has previously won the IEEE Innovative Paper Award, as well as research grants and support from Amazon, Schlumberger, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL).

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Professor John R. Williams, Mohamad Sindi, PhD ‘19 win IEEE Innovative Paper Award

October 22nd, 2019Uncategorized

Professor John R. Williams and PhD  alumnus Mohamad Sindi recently won the IEEE Innovative Paper Award for their paper titled "Using Container Migration for HPC Workloads Resilience". The award was presented during the IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference (HPEC'19) on September 25 in Waltham, MA. The paper was competing against numerous submissions from some top academic institutions such as MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Georgia Tech, Duke, and Carnegie Mellon. The paper introduces an innovative method to address a global challenge in the domain of High Performance Computing (HPC), which is fault-tolerance for large scale HPC workloads. The work was rated as "Outstandingly Novel" in terms of novelty. Their invention uses a machine learning algorithm that is highly accurate in detecting sick machines with a low false positive rate. Upon detection, the container running on the sick machine is frozen, a memory snapshot is taken, and the container is migrated to a healthy machine where the computation is resumed. The whole process is automated and occurs in around 60 seconds on average.

Professor John R. Williams and PhD  alumnus Mohamad Sindi recently won the IEEE Innovative Paper Award for their paper titled “Using Container Migration for HPC Workloads Resilience”. The award was presented during the IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference (HPEC’19) on September 25 in Waltham, MA. The paper was competing against numerous submissions from some top academic institutions such as MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Georgia Tech, Duke, and Carnegie Mellon. The paper introduces an innovative method to address a global challenge in the domain of High Performance Computing (HPC), which is fault-tolerance for large scale HPC workloads. The work was rated as “Outstandingly Novel” in terms of novelty. Their invention uses a machine learning algorithm that is highly accurate in detecting sick machines with a low false positive rate. Upon detection, the container running on the sick machine is frozen, a memory snapshot is taken, and the container is migrated to a healthy machine where the computation is resumed. The whole process is automated and occurs in around 60 seconds on average.

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Rising Ninth grader at Concord-Carlisle High School Naomi Miller part of the MIT-Concord Research Team presents findings at 2019 International Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference

September 13th, 20192019 News in Brief

On August 7, 2019, rising Ninth grader at Concord-Carlisle High School (CCHS) Naomi Miller, part of the MIT-Concord Research Team, presented their findings at the 2019 International Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference in Portland, Oregon. Miller and her colleagues have been working with the Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics (LAMM) and research scientist Dr. Kunal Kupwade-Patil since October 2018 on a NASA Challenge to research methods of making concrete by using synthetic Martian soil in order to print 3D print dwellings on Mars. This summer, the students also spent six weeks working with Concord Middle School science teacher and MIT visiting scholar Doug Shattuck at MIT furthering their research to develop a solar collector in order to melt Martian sand to form structural glass material. Read more here.

On August 7, 2019, rising Ninth grader at Concord-Carlisle High School (CCHS) Naomi Miller, part of the MIT-Concord Research Team, presented their findings at the 2019 International Microscopy and Microanalysis Conference in Portland, Oregon. Miller and her colleagues have been working with the Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics (LAMM) and research scientist Dr. Kunal Kupwade-Patil since October 2018 on a NASA Challenge to research methods of making concrete by using synthetic Martian soil in order to print 3D print dwellings on Mars. This summer, the students also spent six weeks working with Concord Middle School science teacher and MIT visiting scholar Doug Shattuck at MIT furthering their research to develop a solar collector in order to melt Martian sand to form structural glass material. Read more here.

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Former postdoc Wenbo Shi in Professor Desiree Plata’s lab and colleagues from Yale University research featured on cover of Advanced Functional Materials

September 12th, 20192019 News in Brief

Former postdoc Wenbo Shi in Gilbert W. Winslow Career Development Assistant Professor Desiree Plata’s lab and colleagues from Yale University research is featured on the cover of Advanced Functional Materials. Their paper titled, “Engineering carbon nanotube forest superstructure for robust thermal desalination membranes,” can provide insight into an effective strategy to engineer carbon nanotubes to elucidate the structure-property-performance relationship of the nanocomposite membranes and to guide the design of robust thermal desalination membranes. Read more here.

Former postdoc Wenbo Shi in Gilbert W. Winslow Career Development Assistant Professor Desiree Plata’s lab and colleagues from Yale University research is featured on the cover of Advanced Functional Materials. Their paper titled, “Engineering carbon nanotube forest superstructure for robust thermal desalination membranes,” can provide insight into an effective strategy to engineer carbon nanotubes to elucidate the structure-property-performance relationship of the nanocomposite membranes and to guide the design of robust thermal desalination membranes. Read more here.

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Professor Admir Masic and graduate student Janille Maragh publish research paper titled “The Temple Scroll: reconstructing an ancient manufacturing practice,” in Science Advances

September 12th, 20192019 News in Brief

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor Admir Masic, Graduate student Janille Maragh, and colleagues published today a research paper titled, The Temple Scroll: reconstructing an ancient manufacturing practice,” in Science Advances. The Temple Scroll, one of the longest (almost 25 feet long), whitest, and best-preserved of all the texts from the Dead Sea scrolls collection, is significant due to the layered structure of its parchment, which includes a collagenous base material and an atypical inorganic overlayer.The researchers utilized advanced material characterization tools in order to analyze the chemistry of the materials. They found that evaporitic sulfate salts were used, indicative of a unique ancient production technology. Their findings could provide insight into how to preserve invaluable historical documents. Read more on MIT News.

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor Admir Masic, Graduate student Janille Maragh, and colleagues published today a research paper titled, The Temple Scroll: reconstructing an ancient manufacturing practice,” in Science Advances. The Temple Scroll, one of the longest (almost 25 feet long), whitest, and best-preserved of all the texts from the Dead Sea scrolls collection, is significant due to the layered structure of its parchment, which includes a collagenous base material and an atypical inorganic overlayer.The researchers utilized advanced material characterization tools in order to analyze the chemistry of the materials. They found that evaporitic sulfate salts were used, indicative of a unique ancient production technology. Their findings could provide insight into how to preserve invaluable historical documents. Read more on MIT News.

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Professor Elfatih Eltahir, Jeremy S. Pal SM ’97, PhD ’01 and postdoctoral associate Suchul Kang published research paper in Geophysical Research Letters titled “Future heat stress during Muslim pilgrimage (Hajj) projected to exceed ‘extreme danger’ levels”

September 4th, 20192019 News in Brief

Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih Eltahir, Jeremy S. Pal SM ’97, PhD ’01, and postdoctoral associate SuchulKang published research paperin Geophysical Research letters titled, “Future heat stress during Muslim pilgrimage (Hajj) projected to exceed ‘extreme danger’ levels.” Researchers explain that soon the once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage to Mecca, will be hot enough to pose extreme danger due to the combination of rising temperatures as well as humidity. Professor Eltahir stressed that substantial adaptation measures need to be taken to limit the impact of climate change. Read more on MIT News.

Breene M. Kerr Professor Elfatih Eltahir, Jeremy S. Pal SM ’97, PhD ’01, and postdoctoral associate SuchulKang published research paperin Geophysical Research letters titled, “Future heat stress during Muslim pilgrimage (Hajj) projected to exceed ‘extreme danger’ levels.” Researchers explain that soon the once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage to Mecca, will be hot enough to pose extreme danger due to the combination of rising temperatures as well as humidity. Professor Eltahir stressed that substantial adaptation measures need to be taken to limit the impact of climate change. Read more on MIT News.

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