Professor Moshe Ben-Akiva and co-authors publish “Foundations of Stated Preference Elicitation: Consumer Behavior and Choice-based Conjoint Analysis”

February 8th, 20192019 News in Brief

Professor Ben-Akiva and co-authors Daniel McFadden and Kenneth Train, published “Foundations of Stated Preference Elicitation: Consumer Behavior and Choice-based Conjoint Analysis” in Foundations and Trends Econometrics. It provides the reader with stated preference data collection methods, discrete choice models, and statistical analysis tools that can be used to forecast demand and assess welfare impacts for new or modified products or services in real markets, and summarize the conditions under which the reliability of these methods has been demonstrated or can be tested. Read more here.

Professor Ben-Akiva and co-authors Daniel McFadden and Kenneth Train, published “Foundations of Stated Preference Elicitation: Consumer Behavior and Choice-based Conjoint Analysis” in Foundations and Trends Econometrics. It provides the reader with stated preference data collection methods, discrete choice models, and statistical analysis tools that can be used to forecast demand and assess welfare impacts for new or modified products or services in real markets, and summarize the conditions under which the reliability of these methods has been demonstrated or can be tested. Read more here.

+ More

Professor Martin Polz edits new book Population Genomics: Microorganisms

February 8th, 20192018 News in Brief

Professor Martin Polz edited a new book called Population Genomics: Microorganisms. The book discusses advances that have been made, promises of population genomics in microorganisms, and key theoretical and practical challenges for microbial population genomics.  

Professor Martin Polz edited a new book called Population Genomics: Microorganisms. The book discusses advances that have been made, promises of population genomics in microorganisms, and key theoretical and practical challenges for microbial population genomics.

 

+ More

Professor Admir Masic’s ReACT has first cohort of students graduate

February 8th, 20192019 News in Brief

In January, the first cohort of students graduated from Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor Admir Masic's MIT Refugee Action (ReACT) Certificate Program. The graduation ceremony took place in Amman, Jordan and was hosted by ReACT and the MIT Enterprise Forum Pan-Arab region. Fifteen students graduated from the program. Read more here.    

In January, the first cohort of students graduated from Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor Admir Masic’s MIT Refugee Action (ReACT) Certificate Program. The graduation ceremony took place in Amman, Jordan and was hosted by ReACT and the MIT Enterprise Forum Pan-Arab region. Fifteen students graduated from the program. Read more here.

 

 

+ More

Professor Lydia Bourouiba publishes episode on Live Long and Master Aging podcast

February 8th, 20192019 News in Brief

On the latest Live Long and Master Aging podcast entitled “How Did I Get This Cold?”, Associate Professor Lydia Bourouiba discusses our vulnerability to infectious diseases, flu shot effectiveness, living in dense populations, their implications for the spread of disease, and more. Listen here.

On the latest Live Long and Master Aging podcast entitled “How Did I Get This Cold?”, Associate Professor Lydia Bourouiba discusses our vulnerability to infectious diseases, flu shot effectiveness, living in dense populations, their implications for the spread of disease, and more. Listen here.

+ More

Professors Jesse Kroll and Colette Heald create air quality network in Hawaii following the Kilauea volcanic eruptions

February 4th, 20192019 News in Brief

Associate Professor Jesse Kroll and Professor Colette Heald organized real-time air quality research efforts on the Big Island of Hawaii following the Kilauea volcanic eruption in May 2018. Professor Kroll and researchers deployed low-cost sensors around affected zones in order to gain insight into the particles and toxic gas (known as vog) emitted into the atmosphere. Read more on MIT News.

Associate Professor Jesse Kroll and Professor Colette Heald organized real-time air quality research efforts on the Big Island of Hawaii following the Kilauea volcanic eruption in May 2018. Professor Kroll and researchers deployed low-cost sensors around affected zones in order to gain insight into the particles and toxic gas (known as vog) emitted into the atmosphere. Read more on MIT News.

+ More

MEMSI – The Product

January 27th, 2019MEMSI

By Eric Wong '19 FYI-DIY FYI-DIY is a not-for-profit social enterprise platform dedicated to empowering DIYers across America with not just the how-to, but the ‘how-tools’ to do any home improvement project. We are a movement to utilize the increasing availability of 3D printers to share new and innovative tools created by enthusiasts and designs to hack any task. DIYers of any background from your first timers to handymen/women who have never used a CAD program or use it everyday are encouraged to join the community! How-To[ols] Meet Lauren, a 28-year-old UX / UI designer at a tech startup in San Francisco who recently moved into a new home with her husband, cat and dog. She has an eye for style and loves taking on new projects as a form of self-expression. Although she could afford to hire help in preparing her new home, she’s excited to take on the challenge of doing it herself in her free time. The first task that she wants to tackle is putting up a new coat of paint on her walls. However, Lauren knows that properly prepping and priming the surfaces takes a lot of time, something that she doesn’t have much of. So, she turns to FYI-DIY. On the home page, Lauren is able to easily search for one task that she is wondering if people have ‘hacked’ a tool that she can download and get printed at her local library. With a few clicks, Lauren is able to find the downloadable [...]

By Eric Wong ’19
FYI-DIY

FYI-DIY is a not-for-profit social enterprise platform dedicated to empowering DIYers across America with not just the how-to, but the ‘how-tools’ to do any home improvement project. We are a movement to utilize the increasing availability of 3D printers to share new and innovative tools created by enthusiasts and designs to hack any task. DIYers of any background from your first timers to handymen/women who have never used a CAD program or use it everyday are encouraged to join the community!

How-To[ols]

Meet Lauren, a 28-year-old UX / UI designer at a tech startup in San Francisco who recently moved into a new home with her husband, cat and dog. She has an eye for style and loves taking on new projects as a form of self-expression. Although she could afford to hire help in preparing her new home, she’s excited to take on the challenge of doing it herself in her free time.

The first task that she wants to tackle is putting up a new coat of paint on her walls. However, Lauren knows that properly prepping and priming the surfaces takes a lot of time, something that she doesn’t have much of. So, she turns to FYI-DIY.

On the home page, Lauren is able to easily search for one task that she is wondering if people have ‘hacked’ a tool that she can download and get printed at her local library.

With a few clicks, Lauren is able to find the downloadable file for a paint dispenser designed by a member of the community with a few special features to make taping along edges much easier. On this page, she sees a rendered image of the ‘how-tool’ along with a short description and video of it being used posted by the tool creator. Additionally, she can see the estimated print time and costs along with where printers are available nearby if she doesn’t have one herself. For $1, of which seventy percent goes to the original poster and thirty percent goes to the maintenance costs associated with FYI-DIY, Lauren now has the file needed to get the tool printed! 

And just like that, Lauren now has a physical tool to help her paint her walls quickly and easily with a finish similar to that of a professional.

The Opportunity

With over forty percent of Americans considering starting DIY projects and 88% of who are searching online for tips and tricks to help them complete their projects, Lauren is not alone. In fact, the DIY home improvement tool market is estimated to be $14 billion dollars and growing at 6% annually. Combined with a increased availability of 3D printers across the United States with approximately 600 available just at libraries, this medium of creating tools is only being more viable. Large American home improvement stores such as Lowes have already started to embrace this new technology as it partners with Authentise to provide 3D scanning and printing services to its customer for a variety of products from light fixtures to door handles.

The Community

FYI-DIY will be a volunteer led social enterprise, led by a dedicated staff to maintain the website, curate content, and organize community events. DIYers would find not just the tips and tricks, but also the tools to complete their projects with confidence. Additionally, they would have a space to post issues that they face but have not yet found solutions to. Enthusiasts and designers would be encouraged to continue to create new, innovative tools at corporate sponsored hack-athons featuring those common issues and the micro-transaction they are given for each download of the tools they upload.

+ More